联系我们
联系人:袁老师
联系电话:022-23288213
传真:022-23281183
E-mail: tjyixie@163.com
网址:http://www.tatj.com.cn
当前位置:首页 > 协会公告
2018年“外教社杯”天津市高校翻译大赛英译汉、汉译英初赛原文
2018-7-4   浏览量:4598
 

 

请将下列文字译为汉语:

 

 

    When I was sixteen I worked selling hot dogs at a stand in the Fourteenth Street subway 

station in New York City, one level above the trains and one below the street, where the 

crowds continually flowed back and forth. On my break I came out from behind the counter

 and passed the time with two old black men who ran a shoeshine stand in a dark corner of 

the corridor. It was a poor location,half hidden by columns and they didn't have much 

business. I would sit with my back against the wall while they stood or moved around

 their ancient elevated stand, talking to each other or to me, but always staring into the

 distance as they did so. 

 

    As the weeks went by I realized that they never looked at anything in their immediate

 vicinity--not at me or their stand or anybody who might come within ten or fifteen feet.

 They did not look at approaching customers once they were inside the perimeter. 

Save for the instant it took to discern the color of the shoes, they did not even look at

 what they were doing while they worked, but rubbedin polish, brushed, and buffed by

 feel while looking over their shoulders, into the distance, as if awaiting the arrival of

 an important person. Of course there wasn't all that much distance in the underground 

station, but their behavior was so focused and consistent they seemed somehow to 

transcend the physical. A powerful mood was created, and I came almost to believe

 that these men could see through walls, through girders, and around corners to whatever 

hyperspace it was where whoever it was they were waiting and watching for would finally 

emerge. Their scattered talk was hip, elliptical, and hinted at mysteries beyond my white 

boy's ken, but it was the staring off, the long, steady staring off, that had me hypnotized. 

I left for a better job, with handshakes from both of them, without understanding what I 

had seen. 

 

    Perhaps ten years later, after playing jazz with black musicians in various Harlem clubs, 

hanging out uptown with a few young artists and intellectuals, I began to learn from them 

something of the extraordinarily varied and complex riffs and rituals embraced by different 

people to help themselves get through life in the ghetto. Fantasy of all kinds--from playful 

to dangerous--was in the very air of Harlem. It was the spice of uptown life. 

 

    Only then did I understand the two shoeshine men. They were trapped in a demeaning 

situation in a dark corner in an underground corridor in a filthy subway system. Their 

continuous staring off was a kind of statement, a kind of dance. Our bodies are here, went

 the statement, but our souls are receiving nourishment from distant sources only we can see.

 They were powerful magic dancers, sorcerers almost, and  thirty-       five years later I can still feel the pressure of their spell. 

 

    The light bulb may appear over your head, is what I'm saying, but it may be a while 

before it actually goes on. Early in my attempts to learn jazz piano, I used to listen to 

recordings of a fine player named Red Garland, whose music I admired. I couldn't quite

 figure out what he was doing with his left hand, however; the chords eluded me. I went 

uptown to an obscure club where he was playing with his trio, caught him on his break, 

and simply asked him. "Sixths," he said cheerfully. And then he went away. 

 

 

    I didn't know what to make of it. The basic jazz chord is the seventh, which comes in 

various configurations, but it is what it is. I was a self-taught pianist, pretty shaky on theory and harmony, and when he said sixths I kept trying 

to fit the information into what I already knew, and it didn't fit. But it stuck in my mind--a 

tantalizing mystery. 

 

    A couple of years later, when I began playing with a bass player, I discovered more 

or less by accident that if the bass played the root and I played a sixth based on the fifth

 note of the scale, a very interesting chord involving both instruments emerged. Ordinarily, 

I suppose I would have skipped over the matter and not paid much attention, but I remembered 

Garland's remark and so I stopped and spent a week or two working out the voicings, and

 greatly strengthened my foundations as a player. I had remembered what I hadn't understood, 

you might say, until my life caught up with the information and the light bulb went on. 

……

 

    Education doesn't end until life ends, because you never know when you're going to 

understand something you hadn't understood before. For me, the magic dance of the 

shoeshine men was the kind of experience in which understanding came with a kind of 

click, a resolving kind of click. The same with the experience at the piano. Indeed, 

in our intellectual lives, our creative lives, it is perhaps those problems that will never 

resolve that rightly claim the lion's share of our energies. The physical body exists in

 a constant state of tension as it maintains homeostasis, and so too does the active mind 

embrace the tension of never being certain, never being absolutely sure, never being

 done, as it engages the world. That is our special fate, our inexpressibly valuable condition.

 

 

 

请将下列文字译英语:

 

回忆鲁迅先生

 

 

     鲁迅先生的笑声是明朗的,是从心里的欢喜。若有人说了什么可笑的话,鲁迅先生笑的

 连烟卷都拿不住了,常常是笑的咳嗽起来。

 

     鲁迅先生走路很轻捷,尤其他人记得清楚的,是他刚抓起帽子来往头上一扣,同时左腿

 就伸出去了,仿佛不顾一切地走去。

 

     鲁迅先生不大注意人的衣裳,他说:“谁穿什么衣裳我看不见得……”

 

     鲁迅先生生的病,刚好了一点,他坐在躺椅上,抽着烟,那天我穿着新奇的大红的上衣,

 很宽的袖子。


         鲁迅先生说:“这天气闷热起来,这就是梅雨天。”他把他装在象牙烟嘴上的香烟,又

 用手装得紧一点,往下又说了别的。


        许先生忙着家务,跑来跑去,也没有对我的衣裳加以鉴赏。于是我说:“周先生,我的

 衣裳漂亮不漂亮?”


        鲁迅先生从上往下看了一眼:“不大漂亮。”


        过了一会又接着说:“你的裙子配的颜色不对,并不是红上衣不好看,各种颜色都是好看

  的,红上衣要配红裙子,不然就是黑裙子,咖啡色的就不行了;这两种颜色放在一起很浑浊……

 你没看到外国人在街上走的吗?绝没有下边穿一件绿裙子,上边穿一件紫上衣,也没有穿一件红

 裙子而后穿一件白上衣的……”


        鲁迅先生就在躺椅上看着我:“你这裙子是咖啡色的,还带格子,颜色浑浊得很,所以把红

 色衣裳也弄得不漂亮了。”


        “……人瘦不要穿黑衣裳,人胖不要穿白衣裳;脚长的女人一定要穿黑鞋子,脚短就一定要

 穿白鞋子;方格子的衣裳胖人不能穿,但比横格子的还好;横格子的胖人穿上,就把胖子更往两

 边裂着,更横宽了,胖子要穿竖条子的,竖的把人显得长,横的把人显的宽……”


         那天鲁迅先生很有兴致,把我一双短统靴子也略略批评一下,说我的短靴是军人穿的,因为

 靴子的前后都有一条线织的拉手,这拉手据鲁迅先生说是放在裤子下边的……

 

     我说:“周先生,为什么那靴子我穿了多久了而不告诉我,怎么现在才想起来呢?现在我不

 是不穿了吗?我穿的这不是另外的鞋吗?”


        “你不穿我才说的,你穿的时候,我一说你该不穿了。”


        那天下午要赴一个筵会去,我要许先生给我找一点布条或绸条束一束头发。许先生拿了来米色

  的绿色的还有桃红色的。经我和许先生共同选定的是米色的。为着取美,把那桃红色的,许先生

 举起来放在我的头发上,并且许先生很开心地说着:


        “好看吧!多漂亮!”

 


 

 

2018年高校翻译大赛英译汉参赛登记表.doc

2018年高校翻译大赛汉译英参赛登记表.doc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

首页 | 协会概况 | 资讯动态 | 会员简介 | 天译大家谈 | 翻译服务 | 译海浪花
版权所有:天津市翻译协会 津ICP备12008642号津教备0416号 技术支持:华泰科技